Showing posts with label Petite Chou. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Petite Chou. Show all posts

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Petite Chou- Revisit

I eat at the chous a lot for lunch, but I often forget about going to Petite Chou for dinner. The other night we were looking for something other than our usual haunts with the kids, and we all agreed to go.

I was excited to hear (on a Thursday) that they still had some of the duck fat fried chicken, but then when the server told me it would be 30 minutes to get it, I decided to pass on it. My kids are pretty good restaurant diners, but that might push it a bit.  So I decided to go with the crab cake appetizer ($8.95), and hubby got the Bastille Day burger that we shared ($15.95).

I generally do not order crab cakes at restaurants because I am very particular about them, but I really enjoy the crab cakes at Petite Chou. They are pretty thin and made up mainly of crab, with not a lot of filler. The outside is seared so the edges are crisp and they don’t have that overly bready texture like some do. My favorite part was the side salad they serve with it, which is made up of greens, thinly sliced apples and shaved fennel and is served with a very mustardy vinaigrette-type dressing. It is definitely more of an appetizer size (just one cake) but they serve it as an entrée as well (there are two and with an egg on top).

The Bastille burger is a thick patty topped with blue cheese, jowl bacon and pickled red onions. Although it may have been a little more cooked than I would have liked (and asked for), it was still very tender. You can tell they are using a good quality of beef. I loved the flavors of the toppings, but then again those are some of my favorite things. You get tanginess from the onions and the cheese and an extra layer of rich saltiness from the bacon. The burgers come with fries, which are really good—some of the better fries around for sure. They’re cooked fairly dark and served with a Dijon/mayo mix that I really enjoy.

We also all shared a side of the Gruyere mac and cheese with bacon ($6.95). This was also really tasty. I really like the earthy, salty flavor of Gruyere, and it was also still very smooth and creamy. The large chunks of bacon mixed in were great too, although honestly, I think it would be good either way. Hubby really liked the mac and cheese and ate the majority of it.

They have a nice kids’ menu as well, with some different things than the usual. My son had the cheese omelette with toast and my daughter the kid’s burger. They both seemed happy enough, although the patty on the kids’ burger was much smaller than the adult version, which is fine, but the bun was the same, which was weird (and too much bread).

My kids and I split a chocolate crepe (just a crepe with chocolate ganache). It was exactly what they wanted--and the chocolate was quite rich and tasty.

It’s one of the few French restaurants we have (as I have said a million times, what’s up with that?) and it’s a good option for dinner. 

Petite Chou
823 Westfield Blvd
Indy 46220
317/259-0765


Petite Chou on Urbanspoon

Monday, February 27, 2012

Petite Chou - Revisit

I’m back on the fried chicken thing ever since those wings from First Wok the other day.  After having several conversations about the duck fat fried chicken from Petite Chou (in Broad Ripple only) with several people, I finally figured out a Wednesday night, with babysitting to try it (they only do it on Wednesdays).  There were four of us, and we all wanted it—we mentioned it to the server right away, which is advisable because it takes about 30 minutes to cook.  Get your order in, and in the meantime, order a starter and enjoy your drinks.  Also, I am pretty sure they only do so many, so it is a good idea to order before they run out. I am pretty sure the table next to us didn’t get any because they had already run out (us getting 4 orders probably didn’t help.)
To start though, hubby and I shared the wild mushroom duxelles ($6.95).  Friends of mine (including the ones we were with) had had a version of this before and really liked it.  The version they offered on this night though was different from what other people had told me about. This was more like a dip/spread of mushrooms and cream with a sprinkle of fresh parsley on top (it also said that it included shallots and wine).  Unfortunately, it suffered fairly significantly from under seasoning.  We all grabbed for the salt and pepper.  It definitely needed salt and I had an overwhelming desire to squeeze lemon over it to brighten it up.  It was just too one-dimensional of richness.  And I love mushrooms.  We also shared an order of the duck fat frites ($4.95) between the four of us, and these had a great flavor (who doesn’t love duck fat flavor) and they were good and salty.  Putting some of the mushroom stuff on top helped the flavor of the mushrooms a lot by amping up the salt. Pretty sure the duck fat didn’t hurt there either.  The fries on their own were unfortunately a little soft and wimpy.  The flavor was good, the crispiness was not.  I really like their aioli though—nice and garlicky.  There was also a Dijon/mayo blend that was good.  When you’re giving me fancy fries, I like a fancy sauce. I appreciate they weren’t giving us ketchup.  I also really enjoy the bread service at Petite Chou.  Crusty bread slices with nice soft, salty butter. My favorite.
Ok, on to the main reason for our dinner, the duck fat fried chicken ($17.00).  So with this dinner, you get two pieces of chicken (a breast and a leg), mashed potatoes, and a side of green beans.  Hubby was a little sad right away because he’s a thigh man (and he really likes wings as well). We were sort of wondering what happens to all the wings and thighs, but guessed they must just order these particular parts for this meal.  Anyway, as for the chicken, it was really quite good.  And really very HOT! You had to give it a good few minutes to cool down before you could safely take a bite.  But the first thing I noticed when I finally did bite into it was that it had FLAVOR! So many well known fried chicken places in this town know how to fry a tender bird, but seem perplexed by the idea of actually seasoning it before they fry it.  There was some good seasoning in the coating here, as well as the richness that just inherently comes from something being fried in duck fat.  And the outside was super crispy and delicious.  My one complaint is that the breast meat was just a bit dry. The potatoes were served under the chicken and were good with it—nice and buttery.  The green beans were fresh green beans (not those grey-ish canned things) served with diced tomatoes.  They were pretty tasty too (although I’ll admit I didn’t eat much of them, too focused on the bird).
So I enjoyed the fried chicken and would go back for it easily.  I think I would try a different starter next time (I know I would), unless it was more the way it had been described to me before (whole sautéed mushrooms with seasoning).  But there are several lovely sounding salads, and I know Patachou can do a good salad, so that might be a good start next time.  All in all, it was a very successful fried chicken excursion, and worth a trip if you have a strange fried chicken fetish like I do.
Petite Chou
823 Westfield Blvd
Indy 46220
317/259-0765

Monday, August 2, 2010

Petite Chou - Dinner

I can’t quite figure out why Indy has so few French Bistros. It seems to me that simple, French food would be something that Midwesterners could get behind. Honestly, the only place I know of that is doing it is Petite Chou, which is one of the branches of the Patachou brand of restaurants. And it seems like it would be a perfect match really, being that Patachou excels at simple, homey, comfort food. Why not just put a French twist on it and add wine?

So we went to the Petite Chou in Broad Ripple (there is also one in Clay Terrace) for dinner the other night with friends. They have a lovely outside dining area with some ceiling fans that cut the heat a little. I like that if you sit along the side of the building, you are not staring at the street, the tables are nicely spaced and there are some curtains and there is greenery. Feels very bistro-esque.

We started with a couple of appetizers—the duck fat frites and the pate. Wow, the frites were outstanding (one dining companion described them as “spectacular”). They were perfectly crispy, the thin kind, and nicely seasoned with salt (You have to salt these things BEFORE they come out of the kitchen or it doesn’t stick). They had a slight richness from the duck fat and we pretty much ate a large order in record time. They were served with an aioli and Dijon mayo sauce. I couldn’t decide which I liked better. The aioli had the tanginess I like, but was a little bland. The Dijon sauce has maybe just a teeny bit too much kick. I ended up mixing them together on my plate and was very happy. The pate was also good—served with very toasted sliced of bread that was also seasoned and some whole grain local mustard. The crunchiness of the bread was a nice accompaniment to the rich, cold, smoothness of the pate. Maybe not the best pate ever, not as smooth and spreadable as I might have liked, but still nice.

The bread they serve with meals is also quite nice—thinly sliced French bread served with nice soft, salty butter. They had this right on. Hubby and I also split a salad, the mixed greens with warmed goat cheese on top of toasted bread. It was served with blackberry pear vinaigrette. I appreciated that they split the salad for us, and the sweetness of the dressing was great with the goat cheese. It was properly dressed and enjoyable. Our friends shared the caprese which looked nice, although I love a really gooey mozzarella on this type of salad. I didn’t try this though.

At this point in the meal, we were thoroughly enjoying everything we had—the food was very good, the atmosphere was great, the wine (a nice white Burgundy) was perfect and the service was professional. Unfortunately, this is where things took a slight turn for the worse. We got our entrées, and we had all ordered different things. I ordered the scallops which were simply pan seared, served over what they call “pommes puree,” (which are whipped potatoes) with a caper wine sauce. The scallops seemed to be good quality and I liked the sauce—right up my alley with the salty kick from the capers and a nice wine and butter flavor. But they weren’t really seared enough. They weren’t crispy enough on the edges. I like pan seared scallops to be nice and caramelized—the crunch of the sear giving way to the creaminess of the interior of the scallop. These were just not seared enough. And honestly, I could have done without the potatoes—whipped potatoes are served with many of Petite Chou’s dishes. I think I would have preferred something else—maybe just some nice greens or something.

Hubby had the pan seared salmon and asked it to be prepared medium rare. Our server informed us it is usually prepared well done, but that we could order it however we wanted. Unfortunately, I think they just went ahead a cooked it as they usually do as the fish was very cooked all the way through. It had a nice crispy edge and he was given the choice of the potatoes or greens with his and chose the greens. He was happy with that, but wished they had cooked the fish the way he had ordered.

I also had a bite our one of our friend’s paillard, which are listed as specialties of the house. A paillard is a pounded chicken breast that is then pan seared. They serve them with several accompaniments, and he went with the pommes puree (more of the whipped potatoes) as well as arugula and a lemon pan sauce. I have to say, this sounds really good. But when you are pounding a chicken breast this thin (it was quite thin), you have to be really careful not to overcook it and make it tough. They cooked it a bit too long based on the bite I had. It was tough.

Finally, of course we had to have dessert, so we got two crepes and some cheese (wow, we really ate a lot). The crepe I ate was mixed berries with some chocolate sauce and crème anglaise drizzled across. It was tasty. Not overly sweet but with lots and lots of berries. The cheese plate was also nice, although I prefer my cheeses a little more stinky and gooey.

All in all we had an enjoyable meal at Petite Chou. Honestly, I think next time I would maybe skip the entrée, get another appetizer and my own salad and call it a day. The first part of the meal really stood out while the second half was a bit lackluster (the service fell off a bit too during the second half). The atmosphere is nice and the ingredients are good. They are simple yet high quality which is what it should be at a French bistro. Now why doesn’t Indy have more of them again?

Petite Chou
823 Westfield Blvd
Indy 46220
317/259-0765
www.cafepatachou.com

Petite Chou on Urbanspoon